Green coffee for weight loss: dosage, benefits and side effects

Green coffee beans or green coffee extract is very popular nowadays in terms of weight management and weight loss. Everybody wants to get fit and lose that extra weight which they put on. So, its popularity is increasing day by day.

What is green coffee

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Usually, we drink coffee with dark brown beans in colour but green coffee is slightly green. Green coffee is nothing but raw and unroasted coffee beans. It is a cherry-like small plant, seeds of which are called green coffee beans. They are called beans because their shape is just like beans. Basically, they are seeds.

Does green coffee really helps in weight loss

Green coffee beans are high in chlorogenic acid. It is the only important thing found in green coffee due to which green coffee is linked with weight loss. It is a phytochemical and a powerful antioxidant. The chlorogenic acid level is high in green coffee beans than in roasted coffee beans. There are three types of chlorogenic acids and two types of phytochemicals. Caffein is a phytochemical.

Green coffee beans are roasted at a high temperature resulting in dark brown colour. After roasting the green coffee, its aroma, flavour and nutritional value are changed. Coffee is of two types, they are arabica and robusta. Arabica is said to be a good quality coffee. Whenever you are buying green coffee beans then buy organic only.

Best time to consume green coffee

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Normally it is recommended after the meal. But dietitians do not recommend green coffee beans immediately after our meal. Because caffeine present in coffee can cause trouble with our body in absorbing vitamins and minerals. If we take green coffee beans just after our meal, then there can be iron, zinc, magnesium, calcium deficiency in our body. Drinking coffee after a meal can cut down the rate of iron absorption up to 80 per cent and also reduce the uptake of minerals. Also, avoid green coffee in the early morning and after sunset because it contains caffeine which can interfere with your sleep and cause insomnia. The result is, do not consume it empty stomach and do not consume it after a meal.

So, the best time to take green coffee is between your breakfast and lunch. There has to be a gap of one hour before and after a meal. Similarly, you can also take this one-hour after lunch. Second, you can also take green coffee as your pre-workout. Since it contains caffeine, it has the ability to increase your performance level and help you last it longer. It also increases your weight loss and fat loss process during the workout. Another thing, you don’t get benefits just by drinking green coffee, you also have to eat healthy food throughout the day. You have to increase your activity level and reduce your stress level.

Dosage

Recommended dosage for green coffee extract is 200-400 milligram for beginners and the recommended dosage of green coffee beans for beginners is 3 to 5 grams. It is better to take green coffee in beans form than its extract. Whenever you are drinking green coffee, you need to stay hydrated. Drink plenty of water because caffeine and chlorogenic acid present in it can lead to dehydration. So you have to be very careful in proper intake of water.

How to use it

If you have green coffee beans, then first grind them to powder form. Always take small quantities to grind. Just add a teaspoon(3 to 4 grams) of green coffee powder in a cup of hot water. Rest it for 2 to 3 minutes. Then strain and your coffee is ready to drink. The taste is not as bitter as that of roasted coffee.

Benefits of green coffee

  • It has antioxidants which speed up our metabolism and also detoxify our body.
  • It prevents the absorption of fat in our body.
  • It is a powerful appetite suppressant.
  • It increases our energy levels.
  • It improves our immunity and averts the fat accumulation in our body.
  • It enhances the blood circulation and detox liver.
  • It reduces the absorption of sugar in our body and maintains glucose level.
  • It enhances our brain function and improves focus.

Side effects of green coffee

Since it is high in antioxidants, it doesn’t suit to everybody at the beginning. So, we suggest you to start taking this in small quantities. After the consumption of green coffee, if your heartbeat increases, you have headache and anxiety, indigestion and nausea, ringing ears, bloating, acidity and heartburn occurs, then it means you have taken a large quantity of green coffee. You should either reduce the quantity or add some decaf in it.

People taking following medication should avoid green coffee:

  • People on medication of high blood pressure, diabetes, blood thinning.
  • People with anxiety disorder
  • Lactating and pregnant women.
  • People with stomach disorder or suffering from constipation.
  • It is not for teenagers and not for kids.

Get it here

If you want to buy green coffee beans, you can BUY HERE

For green coffee extract, you can BUY HERE

This is all about green coffee beans. But remember always consult your physician or nutritionist before taking green coffee or any other supplements.

What Is Protein & Why Do We Need It ?

Proteins are macro nutrients and are vital to any living organism. Proteins are the important constituent of tissue and cells of the body. They build the important component of muscle and other tissues and vital body fluids like blood. Protein supply the body building material and make good the loss that occur due to wear and tear of muscle fiber. Proteins, as antibodies, help the body to fight against infection. The proteins carry out many metabolic process in the body in form of enzymes and hormones. Thus, proteins have wide range of functions essential for living organism.

Proteins required by the body should be supplied in adequate amount in the diet. The dietary proteins are broken down into amino acids and absorbed as such, these amino acids derived from the dietary proteins are used by the body for various functions like tissue building. The amino acids which are not used for protein synthesis are broken down to provide energy, 1 gram of protein giving rise to 4.2 kcal.

If the diet does not contain adequate carbohydrate and fat to provide energy, dietary protein may be broken down to provide energy which is a wasteful way of using protein.

All foods except refined sugar, oil and fats contain protein to varying degree. some foods contain a high amount of protein and can classified as protein rich food. examples of such food are animals food like meat, fish, egg and plant foods like pulses, oil seeds and nuts

Protein And Amino Acids

Amino Acids are the building block of proteins. there are 19 of them in proteins, 9 of them are designed as “essential amino acids”, since they cannot be synthesised in the body the rest of the amino acids are called “non essential amino acids” as they can be formed in the body by inter conversion of other essential amino acids .

These amino acids are Alanine, Valine, Arginine, Tyrosine, Asparagine, Tryptophan, Cysteine, Threonine, Aspartic acid, Serine, Glutamic acid, Proline, Glutamin, Phenylalanine, Glycine, Methionine, Histidine, Lysine, Isolucine, Lucine.

Requirement

The requirement of proteins depend upon the its quality. The higher the quality, lower the requirement and vice versa.

The requirements are generally determined in terms of egg . The adult requirement of egg protein is 0.7 gram per kg of body weight while requirement in terms of mixed vegetables is 1.0 gram per kg of body weight.

it is to be expected that children require more protein per kg body weight than adults do. Thus, a young child of 1-2 years require 1.2 gram egg protein /kg or 2.0 gram of mixed vegetables protein per kg . Likewise, protein needs of women are greater during pregnancy and lactation than during non lactating state.

Deficiency

  • Loss of muscle mass.
  • Edema.
  • Thin hair.
  • Fatty liver.
  • Higher risk of bone fractures.
  • Stunted growth in children.
  • weak immune system
  • Constant craving.

Sourses

  • Eggs
  • Dairy Products
  • Fish and Sea food
  • Chicken and Turkey
  • Soya
  • Nuts and Seeds
  • Pork
  • Beans and Pulses